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8 Expedition Photography Composition Tips

Much more important than having a good camera is thinking a little bit harder about the composition of your photographs.

So here are my top photography composition tips. Click on the links for examples or watch the video below for explanations.

  1. Rule of thirds
  2. stripes

  3. Lines
  4. Back to England

  5. Angles
  6. Jump: a self portrait

  7. Fill the frame
  8. Notting Hill Carnival

  9. Focal point
  10. X

  11. Active space
  12. Late night in Soho

  13. Framing
  14. View out of a Gloucestershire pub window

  15. Flash
  16. Nemo me impune lacessit

Last year I took a photo every day. Here I explain why.

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Comments

  1. Great tips for converting a dull looking snapshot to a photograph. Shall I add Reflections and Perspective to the list. Stillness of uncharted places are greatly enhanced by including either reflection or perspective in your photograph. My two cents for adventurers.

    PS: I would rather call your active space photographs as having dead or negative space. If I remember correctly, most widely accepted “definition” of active space is the empty space in front of the object, whilst for negative space its behind the object.

    Reply
  2. Rommel Molina Posted

    Awesome stuff! I just got a new camera with the excuse that I’m going to israel in a week and this is exactly the type of tips I needed.

    Cheers!!

    Reply

 
 

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